October 28, 2011

A Different Look at Costs

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So, an interesting viewpoint:
"...What you say about a dedicated position for Director of Adult Learning is interesting. But, the problem is, I can't really afford the cost right now!"

"Yeah, well, think about it this way, how can you NOT afford to invest in the continuous development of your most important asset and resource -- your people. Who makes things happen -- all things happen -- in your school?  Your people do. What is the cost -- to the learning environment, the morale, the unity, the parents and Word of Mouth, each other, and most especially, the students -- if you don't make ongoing, focused learning and renewal a real top priority?
We always look at costs to us. What about the costs in doing or not doing to others?

We always think of costs as outlay.  What changes when we think of costs as affecting outcome. To put it another way, we know how deferred maintenance of our facilities really costs us so much more in the long run.  What will deferred maintenance of our faculty, staff, leadership cost us today, next week, in five years?  What happens when we defer continuous and rigorous strategic learning but the school down the street makes the investment? What might happen if we make an investment now? What might an ongoing and continuous investment yield?  Costs don't result in a return; investments pay us back and yield growth of capital.

It is all in how you choose to look at it.



1 comment:

  1. I agree. I believe that one of the many roles of the school principal is "director of adult learning." But let's face reality. The principalship is so complex, and she is responsible for so many managerial tasks that it's not feasible to dedicate 100% of time and effort to teacher learning, as much as we'd like it to be. I agree that if we truly value learning, we need to make it a priority to ensure our teachers are growing. We can't be successful in moving along in the change process without ensuring they are given the support they need.

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